Pandemic a reminder to never take safe water for granted


David W. Salyers, Guest columnist
Published 7:00 a.m. CT Nov. 28, 2020

It’s time to think about the critical role of the infrastructure of water and wastewater systems that serve our communities.

If you’re like me, your typical day includes several routines. Yet in all our daily activity, we probably don’t pay much attention to the water we use or expect to have available in the normal course of a day.

We don’t think about how the water got there or how available it will be to meet our needs. We tend to take water for granted. But stop and consider how your day would go if there were no water. When considered in detail, it’s easier to see just how valuable this natural resource is in our lives.

Imagine a Day Without Water

Tennessee recently joined other states in observing the sixth annual Imagine a Day Without Water, led by the U.S. Water Alliance, a national nonprofit organization representing utilities, public officials, the business community, environmental organizations, community leaders, policy organizations and researchers. The lesson is applicable anytime, not just on the day set aside for it.

The issue is about water in the home during this pandemic, or the water we expect anytime in businesses, hospitals and public areas. It’s time to think about the critical role of the infrastructure of water and wastewater systems that serve our communities, and it’s about expressing our gratitude to those who work diligently around the clock every day to make sure our water systems are functioning and are safe. 

Your state. Your stories. Support more reporting like this.
A subscription gives you unlimited access to stories across Tennessee that make a difference in your life and the lives of those around you. Click here to become a subscriber.

Planning and managing our resources

In Tennessee, we are blessed with healthy sources of water throughout our state, but it would be a mistake to assume it will always be that way without steps to preserve that resource. At the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, we have led a range of partners to form TNH2O, a collaboration at the federal, state and local levels, along with industry, higher education and environmental advocacy groups, to form a framework for planning and managing our water resources. Our effort includes assessing the current water supply and recommendations to make sure we maintain those resources to meet the future demands of our population.

Hear more Tennessee voices: Get the weekly opinion newsletter for insightful and thought-provoking columns.

We use various tools to enhance and protect the water supply in communities large and small. One of the best examples of how…



Read more:: Pandemic a reminder to never take safe water for granted

Related Posts

Next Post

Discussion about this post

Today News Hub

Don't Miss